Head & Contact

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Prof. Dr. Bernhard G. Herrmann
Director, Head Dept. of Developmental Genetics
Phone:+49 30 8413-1409Fax:+49 30 8413-1130

Projects

Gene Regulatory Networks controlling Trunk Development in the Mouse

The trunk and tail develop by continuous elongation of the anterior body anlage, which gives rise to the head and neck. This elongation process is controlled by a caudal structure, the primitive streak and the tailbud, respectively, which act as growth zone in which stem cells are constantly producing descendants adding to the different lineages ... [more]
The histone modifying complexes PRC2 and TrxG/MLL play pivotal roles in determining the activation state of genes controlling pluripotency, lineage commitment, and cell differentiation. ChIP-seq data, thus identifying several hundred lncRNAs expressed in a differential or tissue restricted manner. We have started to analyze the role and mechanism of action of lncRNAs in mouse embryogenesis ...

Long non-coding RNAs in mouse embryogenesis

The histone modifying complexes PRC2 and TrxG/MLL play pivotal roles in determining the activation state of genes controlling pluripotency, lineage commitment, and cell differentiation. ChIP-seq data, thus identifying several hundred lncRNAs expressed in a differential or tissue restricted manner. We have started to analyze the role and mechanism of action of lncRNAs in mouse embryogenesis ... [more]

The mouse t-haplotype, a variant region on chromosome 17, is transmitted at non-mendelian ratio (up to 99%) from (t/+) heterozygous males to their offspring. This phenomenon, termed transmission ratio distortion (TRD) is caused by the interaction of several genes. At least four distorter genes act additively to enhance the transmission of the responder gene. The role of the distorters is to impair the motility of sperm cells, while the responder is able to rescue the motility. However, rescue takes place only in sperm carrying the responder ...

Non-mendelian inheritance caused by the mouse t-haplotype

The mouse t-haplotype, a variant region on chromosome 17, is transmitted at non-mendelian ratio (up to 99%) from (t/+) heterozygous males to their offspring. This phenomenon, termed transmission ratio distortion (TRD) is caused by the interaction of several genes. At least four distorter genes act additively to enhance the transmission of the responder gene. The role of the distorters is to impair the motility of sperm cells, while the responder is able to rescue the motility. However, rescue takes place only in sperm carrying the responder ... [more]
 
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